Computer Science Ontology

The Computer Science Ontology is a large-scale ontology of research areas that was automatically generated using the Klink-2 algorithm on a dataset of about 16 million publications, mainly in the field of Computer Science. In the rest of the paper, we will refer to this corpus as the Rexplore dataset.
The current version of CSO includes 14,164 topics and 162,121 semantic relationships. The main root is Computer Science; however, the ontology includes also a few secondary roots, such as Linguistics, Geometry, Semantics, and so on.
CSO presents two main advantages over manually crafted categorisations used in Computer Science (e.g., 2012 ACM Classification, Microsoft Academic Search Classification). First, it can characterise higher-level research areas by means of hundreds of sub-topics and related terms, which enables to map very specific terms to higher-level research areas. Secondly, it can be easily updated by running Klink-2 on a set of new publications.

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Invited Talk – Early detection of Research Topics

On 2nd of August 2018, I have been invited by Boris Veytsman, Principal Research Scientist at Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (formerly Meta), to give a talk about my PhD work. Differently from my previous talk to the ORNL group, I had the opportunity to describe my doctoral work more comprehensively. More specifically, I initially showed what is available […]

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Invited Talk – AUGUR: Forecasting the Emergence of New Research Topics

On 30th Jul 2018, I have been invited from Dasha Herrmannova, former PhD student at the KMi, to give a talk at the “Machine Learning and Graph Mining for Big Scholarly Data” workshop organised for the Computational Data Analytics Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In this talk, named “AUGUR: Forecasting the Emergence of New […]

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The Computer Science Ontology: A Large-Scale Taxonomy of Research Areas

Ontologies of research areas are important tools for characterising, exploring, and analysing the research landscape. Some fields of research are comprehensively described by large-scale taxonomies, e.g., MeSH in Biology and PhySH in Physics. Conversely, current Computer Science taxonomies are coarse-grained and tend to evolve slowly. For instance, the ACM classification scheme contains only about 2K research topics and the last version dates back to 2012. In this paper, we introduce the Computer Science Ontology (CSO), a large-scale, automatically generated ontology of research areas, which includes about 26K topics and 226K semantic relationships. It was created by applying the Klink-2 algorithm on a very large dataset of 16M scientific articles.

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Springer Nature Hack Day – Berlin

On 26-27 April 2018, Francesco Osborne and I attended the third edition of the Springer Nature Hack Day, which was held in its headquarter in Berlin. The Springer Nature Hack Day is an event that allows researchers, developers, tech companies, and Springer Nature itself, to gather together and tackle current research issues. Offering also opportunities […]

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AUGUR: Forecasting the Emergence of New Research Topics

“AUGUR: Forecasting the Emergence of New Research Topics” is a paper submitted to the ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2018, presented on June 5 2018, in Fort Worth, TX, USA   Angelo Salatino, Francesco Osborne and Enrico Motta   Abstract Being able to rapidly recognise new research trends is strategic for many stakeholders, including universities, […]

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Computer Science Ontology Portal (or simply CSO Portal)

The Computer Science Ontology Portal (also referred to simply as CSO Portal) is a web application that enables users to download, explore, and provide granular feedback on CSO at different levels. This last feature allows us to periodically review the status ontology and release new version according to the received feedbacks.

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SpringerNature Hackday – London

On the 29th November 2017, myself with two KMi colleagues (Andrea Mannocci and Thiviyan Thanapalasingam) attended the second edition of SpringerNature HackDay in London (@ SpringerNature Campus). Aliaksandr Birukou, Executive Editor of Computer Science at Springer Nature and collaborator of our research team at the Knowledge Media Institute, also joined our group on the HackDay. The whole […]

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Early Detection of Research Trends

Being able to rapidly recognise new research trends is strategic for many stakeholders, including universities, institutional funding bodies, academic publishers and companies. The literature presents several approaches to identifying the emergence of new research topics, which rely on the assumption that the topic is already exhibiting a certain degree of popularity and consistently referred to by a community of researchers. However, detecting the emergence of a new research area at an embryonic stage, i.e., before the topic has been consistently labelled by a community of researchers and associated with a number of publications, is still an open challenge.

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3MT – Early detection of research trends

On 16th May 2017, the STEM Faculty of my university organised a 3 Minutes Thesis (3MT) in which each candidate has a time slot of three minutes to describe their thesis. The speech can be supported by one static slide showing important features of the work. I wish I had shown the one above. In […]

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