The CSO Classifier: Ontology-Driven Detection of Research Topics in Scholarly Articles

Classifying research papers according to their research topics is an important task to improve their retrievability, assist the creation of smart analytics, and support a variety of approaches for analysing and making sense of the research environment. In this paper, we present the CSO Classifier, a new unsupervised approach for automatically classifying research papers according to the Computer Science Ontology (CSO), a comprehensive ontology of research areas in the field of Computer Science. The CSO Classifier takes as input the metadata associated with a research paper (title, abstract, keywords) and returns a selection of research concepts drawn from the ontology. The approach was evaluated on a gold standard of manually annotated articles yielding a significant improvement over alternative methods.

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New release: CSO Classifier v2.1

We are pleased to announce that we recently created a new release of the CSO Classifier (v2.1), an application for automatically classifying research papers according to the Computer Science Ontology (CSO). Recently, we have been intensively working on improving its scalability, removing all its bottlenecks and making sure it could be run on large corpus. […]

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CSO Classifier

Classifying research papers according to their research topics is an important task to improve their retrievability, assist the creation of smart analytics, and support a variety of approaches for analysing and making sense of the research environment. In this page, we present the CSO Classifier, a new unsupervised approach for automatically classifying research papers according to the Computer Science Ontology (CSO), a comprehensive ontology of research areas in the field of Computer Science.

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Invited Talk – Early detection of Research Topics

On 2nd of August 2018, I have been invited by Boris Veytsman, Principal Research Scientist at Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (formerly Meta), to give a talk about my PhD work. Differently from my previous talk to the ORNL group, I had the opportunity to describe my doctoral work more comprehensively. More specifically, I initially showed what is available […]

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Invited Talk – AUGUR: Forecasting the Emergence of New Research Topics

On 30th Jul 2018, I have been invited from Dasha Herrmannova, former PhD student at the KMi, to give a talk at the “Machine Learning and Graph Mining for Big Scholarly Data” workshop organised for the Computational Data Analytics Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In this talk, named “AUGUR: Forecasting the Emergence of New […]

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Classifying Research Papers with the Computer Science Ontology

The CSO Classifier is an application for automatically classifying academic papers according to the rich taxonomy of topics from CSO. The aim is to facilitate the adoption of CSO across the various communities engaged with scholarly data and to foster the development of new applications based on this knowledge base.

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The Computer Science Ontology: A Large-Scale Taxonomy of Research Areas

Ontologies of research areas are important tools for characterising, exploring, and analysing the research landscape. Some fields of research are comprehensively described by large-scale taxonomies, e.g., MeSH in Biology and PhySH in Physics. Conversely, current Computer Science taxonomies are coarse-grained and tend to evolve slowly. For instance, the ACM classification scheme contains only about 2K research topics and the last version dates back to 2012. In this paper, we introduce the Computer Science Ontology (CSO), a large-scale, automatically generated ontology of research areas, which includes about 26K topics and 226K semantic relationships. It was created by applying the Klink-2 algorithm on a very large dataset of 16M scientific articles.

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AUGUR: Forecasting the Emergence of New Research Topics

“AUGUR: Forecasting the Emergence of New Research Topics” is a paper submitted to the ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2018, presented on June 5 2018, in Fort Worth, TX, USA   Angelo Salatino, Francesco Osborne and Enrico Motta   Abstract Being able to rapidly recognise new research trends is strategic for many stakeholders, including universities, […]

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