Integrating Knowledge Graphs for Comparing the Scientific Output of Academia and Industry

Analysing the relationship between academia and industry allows us to understand how the knowledge produced by the universities is being adopted and enriched by the industrial sector, and ultimately affects society through the release of relevant products and services. In this paper, we present a preliminary approach to assess and compare the research outputs of academia and industry. This solution integrates data from several knowledge graphs describing scientific articles (Microsoft Academics Graph), research topics (Computer Science Ontology), organizations (Global Research Identifier Database), and types of industry (DBpedia). We focus on the Semantic Web as exemplary field and report several insights regarding the different behaviours of academia and industry, and the types of industries most active in this field.

Read More

The CSO Classifier: Ontology-Driven Detection of Research Topics in Scholarly Articles

Classifying research papers according to their research topics is an important task to improve their retrievability, assist the creation of smart analytics, and support a variety of approaches for analysing and making sense of the research environment. In this paper, we present the CSO Classifier, a new unsupervised approach for automatically classifying research papers according to the Computer Science Ontology (CSO), a comprehensive ontology of research areas in the field of Computer Science. The CSO Classifier takes as input the metadata associated with a research paper (title, abstract, keywords) and returns a selection of research concepts drawn from the ontology. The approach was evaluated on a gold standard of manually annotated articles yielding a significant improvement over alternative methods.

Read More

Classifying Research Papers with the Computer Science Ontology

The CSO Classifier is an application for automatically classifying academic papers according to the rich taxonomy of topics from CSO. The aim is to facilitate the adoption of CSO across the various communities engaged with scholarly data and to foster the development of new applications based on this knowledge base.

Read More

The Computer Science Ontology: A Large-Scale Taxonomy of Research Areas

Ontologies of research areas are important tools for characterising, exploring, and analysing the research landscape. Some fields of research are comprehensively described by large-scale taxonomies, e.g., MeSH in Biology and PhySH in Physics. Conversely, current Computer Science taxonomies are coarse-grained and tend to evolve slowly. For instance, the ACM classification scheme contains only about 2K research topics and the last version dates back to 2012. In this paper, we introduce the Computer Science Ontology (CSO), a large-scale, automatically generated ontology of research areas, which includes about 26K topics and 226K semantic relationships. It was created by applying the Klink-2 algorithm on a very large dataset of 16M scientific articles.

Read More

AUGUR: Forecasting the Emergence of New Research Topics

“AUGUR: Forecasting the Emergence of New Research Topics” is a paper submitted to the ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2018, presented on June 5 2018, in Fort Worth, TX, USA   Angelo Salatino, Francesco Osborne and Enrico Motta   Abstract Being able to rapidly recognise new research trends is strategic for many stakeholders, including universities, […]

Read More

2100 AI: Reflections on the mechanisation of scientific discovery

“2100 AI: Reflections on the mechanisation of scientific discovery” is a paper submitted to the RE-CODING BLACK MIRROR Workshop co-located with the International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC) 2017, 21-25 October 2017, Vienna, Austria. Authors Andrea Mannocci, Angelo Salatino, Francesco Osborne and Enrico Motta Abstract The pace of nowadays research is hectic. Datasets and papers are […]

Read More

Smart Book Recommender: A Semantic Recommendation Engine for Editorial Products

“Smart Book Recommender: A Semantic Recommendation Engine for Editorial Products” is a poster paper that will be presented at the International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC) 2017, 21-25 October 2017, Vienna, Austria. Authors Francesco Osborne, Thiviyan Thanapalasingam, Angelo Salatino, Aliaksandr Birukou and Enrico Motta Abstract Academic publishers, such as Springer Nature, need to constantly make informed decisions […]

Read More

How are topics born? Understanding the research dynamics preceding the emergence of new areas

“How are topics born? Understanding the research dynamics preceding the emergence of new areas” is a peer-reviewed paper submitted to PeerJ Computer Science. The paper has been submitted in July 2016 and accepted in May 2017. All the co-authors are thankful to the reviewers and the editor for providing insightful comments and thus improving the […]

Read More